Tag Archives: Fusion

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Album Review: BADBADNOTGOOD – IV

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Five years after the release of their debut album, the Canadian jazz band BADBADNOTGOOD has made a name for themselves as one of the most versatile quartets to enter the music scene. BBNG has evolved plenty; they’ve been touring the world and working on music continuously throughout this past decade. It’s fascinating to hear the evolution unfold and witness into which directions the band is willing to venture. They demonstrate a brilliant idea of what jazz music could sound like if hip hop artists were to tackle the genre. After having covered Odd Future, J Dilla, James Blake and Flying Lotus tracks, and worked on an entire collaboration album with Wu-Tang member Ghostface Killah, now BADBADNOTGOOD has released their fourth solo effort appropriately named IV. This album is the band’s most confident and endearing project so far; it exhibits a style that has been crafted by inspired young artists. The production is brighter, cleaner and as engrossing as ever thanks to the talented guests featured on the project.   Continue reading

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Album Review: Ras Moshe and Stefan Christoff- Rêves Sonores à Alwan

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In the realm of contemporary music, free jazz and electronic sound art have run in similar directions.  The idea that an architect of sound can evoke a meaning that is rooted in traditional musical phrasing, yet free from the traditional systematic approach to organizing pitch and rhythm is the basis behind both art forms.  Despite the similarities in mentality and phrase structure, the contrasting sound aesthetics valued in each musical style provide for ideas that communicate without producing a sound leaning more towards one art form.  On Rêves Sonores à Alwan, the newest release from Montreal’s own Howl Arts Collective, Saxophone player Ras Moshe, Pianist Stefan Christoff, and producer Nick Schofield have joined forces resulting in a piece of music that explores the expressive possibilities of sound in both an electronic based community as well as a more jazz rooted conception. Continue reading

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Album Review: Miles Davis – Bitches Brew

Screen shot 2016-04-08 at 1.18.16 PMEver since the world discovered Miles Davis, he was always seen knocking at the doors of musical styles not yet known. Miles, who rose to fame from the popular uproar of bebop in New York City during the 1940’s, was never content with staying in the same lane. By the end of the 1940’s Davis had introduced ‘cool jazz’ to the world with his Birth of the Cool sessions, and barely a decade later, turned the jazz community on its side again by debuting his ‘modal jazz’ style, backed by his album Kind of Blue, the success and praise of which has gained the album musical immortality. By 1967, Miles remained one of the most prominent jazz icons. However, the 60’s were ‘brewing’ and there was a huge influx of new musical styles that Miles Davis was not ignorant of. Saxophonist Wayne Shorter is quoted saying that at this time Miles was “…looking for something with more traction.”  At this point Miles was already being influenced by the R&B sounds of the decade; in addition, his soon-to-be second wife, Betty Mabry, introduced Miles to even more new sounds and fashions of the time. Miles was inspired to discard his fitted suits for the technicolor garb of the decade, and play the records of Jimi Hendrix and Sly Stone.  With his 1969 release of In a Silent Way, a divergent and experimental fusion album, Miles had now almost completely alienated the jazz realm with his off-beat musical reinvention. However, In a Silent Way was only a prequel to Davis’s new style. In 1970 Miles would take a huge step forward, releasing his monumental, avant-garde album Bitches BrewContinue reading

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Concert Review: Chance The Rapper

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There have been a lot of issues with Spotify, streaming, and many other aspects of the digital music age lately.  Big name artists have become more outspoken about music corporations and their ability to make money off of someone else’s art without paying them back for it and a lot of people seem to be left in a state of “how do I make money?”  U2’s response was to forcibly download their album onto every iPhone on the planet, which supposedly proved that they were not in it for the money, but left no one particularly happy.  A certain country/pop artist who is not exactly in desperate need of any more publicity had her world famous remarks about Spotify, but in the midst of all this controversy, there’s one particular genre that has truly embraced the mentality that artists do not make music so that “people can pay for it;” hip hop.  From Run The Jewels’ crowdfunded, for-charity remix album to Big K.R.I.T.’s insane datpiff collection (a free mixtape downloading website), many a hip hop artist has taken it upon themselves to put their audience and art in front of their chart placement and moneymaking.  Perhaps at the forefront of this mentality, is the collective Social Experiment ensemble headed by Donnie Trumpet and the one and only Chance the Rapper.  I had a chance to see this group play last week and the amazing results of their live set are rooted in their grassroots, “not in it for the money” mentality. Continue reading